Sunny Gho Talks Jupiter’s Legacy Vol. 2

This article was originally published at ComicBook.Com on June 7, 2016.

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Jupiter’s Legacy, one of the biggest hits at Image Comics in recent years, makes its long-awaited return at the end of June. The superhero epic spanning three generations of characters will resume its narrative as Jason and his family prepare to fight back against the heroes who previously seized control of the world. Volume two of Jupiter’s Legacy will also avoid the delays that plagued the first five issues with art for the second half almost entirely complete already. It promises to be every bit as exciting and thought-provoking while also providing readers a new installment every month.

In a series of conversations with the full creative team, ComicBook.Com sat down with writer Mark Millar, artist Frank Quitely, and now the series new colorist Sunny Gho to discuss the return of Jupiter’s Legacy and what he hopes to achieve with the series.

When were you first brought into the development of the second volume ofJupiter’s Legacy?

Sunny Gho: Mid April, i woke up to the email and didn’t get to get back to sleep for 3 days due to unsually high excitement.

After having been invited onto the project, what was it that you had the most excited to begin work on the story?

Gho: Working on Mark’s books are always a pleasure for me as I love his stories but – sorry Mark – this time it’s Frank Quietly. Super exicted to finally work with him. It’s a dream comes true really.

You previously worked on Millarworld comics Supercrooks and Superior. Have you found the experience working on these titles and Jupiter’s Legacy to be different or unique from your work on other series?

Gho: Again, working with Frank is a really different experience. He’s been paired with great colorists over his carreer and somehow he’s been treated quite similar and creates a unique visual legacy of Frank Quitely’s comics. In this sense I have to work within my skill and pallette range while trying not to throw that legacy away. Ultimately, I always found Millarworld titles challenging with Mark’s choice of super artists which is pressuring, but to match it I only have to bring something more on the table.

Peter Doherty was the colorist on the first volume of Jupiter’s Legacy. Has taking over his role posed any challenges in making the series feel cohesive?

Gho: I have to admit that I have some troubles in the beginning trying to match what Peter does over Frank’s since I can’t really replicate his style completely even I wanted to, but the team ultimately decided to give a free rein over the book and I can work with my usual style while trying to be as cohesive as possible with the first book. And oh, that “decided to give me free rein” thing makes me redo the whole book haha!

Mark has described the two halves of Jupiter’s Legacy as representing “despair” and “hope”. How are you trying to evoke a tone of hope in the visuals of the second volume?

Gho: This part is what makes my life a little bit easier. Since the tone is decidedly different from the first book, I’ve been asked to be more vibrant on my pallettes, and I think to some extent we did ( Frank is very helpful on this part ) evoke more “hope” versus the mostly muted first issue. This hopefully allows the transition of style from Peter to mine works a little better too.

This will be your first collaboration with Frank Quitely. What has your experience working with him been like?

Gho: It’s mindblowing. Before I only gets to watch from afar reading his books but working on it is totally different experience and just make you respect him more. Well, you know what I’m saying.

The second volume of Jupiter’s Legacy will be introducing a lot of new characters, specifically supervillains, all in need of new costumes. What was the process working with Frank Quitely like designing all of these new characters?

Gho: Again, usually Frank already knows what he wanted. While he’s open to suggestions, I think his ( color ) choice works best in his books. If I’m asked to pick the colors I will just have try to guess what he would do anyway.

Jupiter’s Legacy is a generational story with three distinct ages of people, the originals heroes, their children, and now grandchildren, all sharing the story. Is there a way you attempt to distinguish this element and separate the costumes, look, and feel of different sets of characters? 

Gho: I always try to separate scenes by a unique pallete so readers can read the transition easier and Peter has pretty much set the tone for all 3 ages in the first book so I just naturally use it.

Looking ahead at the first issue coming out in just under a month, what has you most excited about getting this comic in reader’s hands?

Gho: I just hope I do the book justice. If I let readers down this time probably it’s the end of my carreer LOL.

Is there a favorite panel or moment from the first issue you’d like to share with readers and talk about your work on it?

Gho: This is what I’m saying by “watching from afar” is different by actually worked on Frank’s pages. When I read his books, I know he’s a stickler for details, but when I actually colored it i literally shouted “god, this guy drawseverything!! Look at that hairdryer and battery cases“. I don’t know with you, fellow colorists, but I dont meet a page like this every day.

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About chasemagnett

Chase is a mild-mannered finance guy by day and a raving comics fan by night. He has been reading comics for more than half of his life (all 23 years of it). After graduating from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln with degrees in Economics and English, he has continued to research comics while writing articles and reviews online. His favorite superhero is Superman and he'll accept no other answers. Don't ask about his favorite comic unless you're ready to spend a day discussing dozens of different titles.
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